CMM Logo

Council of
Music Makers

We are the music makers,
And we are the dreamers of dreams,
Wandering by lone sea-breakers,
And sitting by desolate streams;—
World-losers and world-forsakers,
On whom the pale moon gleams:
Yet we are the movers and shakers
Of the world for ever, it seems.

Arthur O’Shaughnessy

Who we are

The voice for all UK music creators and performers, the UK Council of Music Makers (CMM) consists of the Ivors Academy, FAC, MMF, MPG and the MU, jointly campaigning for protections in law for the UK music industry’s creative talent, to ensure they can thrive in the digital age.

Without music and someone to perform it, there is no music business.



Ivors Logo   FAC Logo   MMF Logo   MPG Logo   MU Logo  
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News




UK Music Makers call on Treasury to make £80m of the Culture Recovery Fund available to creative freelancers in England


LONDON 24th March 2021

• Tens of thousands of freelance workers are still unable to access any financial support.
• Equivalent support schemes are in place in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland.
• As it stands, institutions with access to CRF in England cannot provide trickle-down opportunities to individual workers, with restrictions still in place.

An open letter from the UK Council of Music Makers: freelancers need specific support now or we face losing a significant proportion of this highly-skilled workforce and their great economic value

LONDON - March, 2021: The UK Council of Music Makers (CMM) - comprising FAC, The Ivors Academy, MMF, MPG and the MU - calls on the Treasury to make £80m of the Culture Recovery Fund available to creative freelancers in England.

As the united voice of music creators and performers, CMM writes to you in consideration of the many creative freelancers who still do not qualify for either the Government's Job Retention Scheme (JRS) or Self-Employed Income Support Scheme (SEISS).

The UK's music industry, worth £5.8bn annually to the UK economy prior to the pandemic, has a 72% freelance workforce. Over 90% of music makers are freelance.

We call on the Treasury to make £80m of the remaining Culture Recovery Fund available to freelancers in the arts who have fallen through the gaps of Government support. This has happened in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland and has been hugely welcomed by the arts and music sector in those devolved nations.

Institutions that have access to the Culture Recovery Fund in England do not have the ability to provide sufficient trickle-down opportunities to individuals that make up the workforce at this time, with restrictions still in place. We must see specific support for these individuals, now, before we experience further, damaging industry-wide loss. Grants provided by the likes of Arts Council England for project work and Help Musicians UK for hardship do not replace the huge financial losses and accruing debts faced by so many freelancers. These funds, in any case, have seen an unprecedented increase in demand and a drastic reduction in the proportion of successful applicants.

Cross-referencing findings of Covid-19 Impact Polls by the Musicians' Union, looking at the impact of the pandemic on musicians in particular, at the time of writing at least 31% still do not qualify for either SEISS or the JRS. Given the Union's 31,000 strong membership, this represents almost 10,000 music makers who have fallen through the gaps in support. While we gratefully welcome the extension of the two schemes to the newly self-employed, which accounted for around 15% of excluded music makers, this has not taken care of all those who missed out.

In the first few months of the pandemic in 2020, over 20,000 music makers applied to music industry hardship funds and many of them are still struggling to pay their bills. The majority of music makers are not dormant when they are unpaid; they continue to practice, write, rehearse and record, to a certain extent, whether they are paid or not. However, many have had to seek alternative work and 40% have indicated that they may have to leave the industry for good. With prospects of returning to full-time paid work in music still months away, they need to be able to access urgent financial support to sustain them while the industry plans to reopen.

We want to preserve our world-leading music making workforce and avoid a haemorrhage of talent. The Government can help artists, musicians, songwriters, music producers and their support teams to survive this last stage of the crisis and get back to what they do best when restrictions on live performance are lifted, not just in the UK but globally.

Our collective memberships - musicians, songwriters, composers, producers, sound engineers, artists and their managers - are central to the UK's music industry and the wider economy. Their all-important contribution within the ecosystem as the value creators should not be ignored.

As much of the workforce faces further redundancies, financial devastation and irreparable damage, we need action now before we lose our talent and economic value for good.

Yours sincerely,

Council of Music Makers (UK)

Featured Artists Coalition (FAC) / Ivors Academy (IA) / Music Managers Forum (MMF) Music Producers Guild (MPG) / Musicians’ Union (MU)



UK Music Makers call on Government for urgent European touring transition fund as Brexit border bureaucracy is killing UK music export


LONDON 16th March 2021

• Brexit-induced increases in costs and processes are hindering UK music’s export business.
• A short-term transition fund is needed to mitigate immediate issues and prevent long-term damage by enabling touring to go ahead post-Covid.
• The world-class standing of UK music is at risk.

LONDON - March 2021: The UK Council of Music Makers (CMM) - comprising FAC, The Ivors Academy, MMF, MPG and the MU - call on Government to urgently implement a specific European touring transition fund to combat drastically increased costs and bureaucracy posed by Brexit, faced by those looking to tour Europe later in 2021 and into 2022 as Covid guidelines allow.

While the CMM welcomes recent support from the Chancellor for music makers and their teams in relation to the devastating impact of the pandemic - with extension of the Self-Employment Income Support Scheme, furlough and Culture Recovery Fund - there is a further, immediate crisis for these workers now facing another blow due to Brexit disarray. This is killing UK music export opportunities and stifling UK music’s global standing, culturally and economically. The UK’s reputation as one of the greatest homes of musical talent, that has toured the world, bringing income to the UK and exerting soft power, is at significant risk.

While the UK Government must urgently come to terms in negotiating bilateral agreements with individual EU member states, music makers; songwriters, artists, musicians, producers and their managers, face turning down, cancelling and simply not embarking on European touring opportunities due to new visa, work permit and carnet costs, extended processes with time, checks and paperwork, plus restrictions on concert haulage, making usual business endeavours in this area simply unviable.

British artists played over 20,000 dates touring Europe (in 2019, pre-Covid), in turn employing more than 30,000 people (including musicians and crew), cementing our international reputation as leading the world in creating great music. Not only does live performance create critical revenue for performers and their teams, it also acts to fuel the creation of the music that sits at the core of our recorded industry. We need urgent help now to ensure British talent is not blocked from growing their audiences internationally in the short term which brings long term implications on loss of future revenue.

Music Makers are being forced to turn down opportunities to tour in Europe because of changes posed by Brexit as it stands due to those additional costs. If they cannot work in person in Europe, this has a knock on effect on radio play, streams, merchandise, festival bookings, future earnings - they are not being seen, nor heard, and it is negatively impacting the business across the board.

Will the next Adele, Dua Lipa, Ed Sheeran or Stormzy not come to light because of these restrictions? Let’s not allow the momentum of this success to diminish. An urgent transition fund is needed for European touring as part of the bigger picture of an industry that has proven growth year-on-year and is worth billions of pounds to the UK economy.

The fishing industry recently received further support to deal with post-Brexit export issues, expanding on a £23m support package. UK music touring employs more than double that of fishing yet has received no equivalent support. None of the other support schemes deal with these issues, we need a new dedicated fund.

For UK music to retain its leading global standing, a post-Brexit European tour support fund is needed now before irreparable damage is done and we lose our talent and economic value in this area of business.


UK Music Makers call on Government for specialist support for music industry workers as hardship sets in and mass exodus continues


LONDON 28th September 2020

• Significant loss of highly-trained and skilled workers.
• Many workers face hardship - some still with no support at all.
• An economic asset valued at £5.2bn GVA, the music industry is facing irreparable decay without specific support for the workforce.

An open letter from the UK Council of Music Makers: individuals need sector-specific support now or we face losing UK’s music industry - a £5.2bn asset to the economy

LONDON - September 28, 2020: The UK Council of Music Makers (CMM) - comprising FAC, The Ivors Academy, MMF, MPG and the MU - call on Government to urgently implement a sector-specific funding package to support individual workers of the music industry - an asset worth £5.2bn GVA to the economy.

As the united voice of music creators and performers, CMM writes to you in consideration of preserving the workforce, the highly-skilled foundation of the music industry. While we welcome the provisions in the Chancellor’s Winter Economy Plan - VAT reduction, Bounceback Loan payback extension, extension to SEISS and the Job Support Scheme - these measures do not go far enough for our industry.

Events, arts and culture industries have three times more the national average of workers on furlough and the music industry has freelance workforce of 72% (a portion of some 190,000 jobs), many of whom continue not to qualify for support under such schemes. The implication that the occupations of many in this world-beating music business are not ‘viable’ does not marry with its large-scale contribution to the economy.

A recent Musicians’ Union survey of 2000 of their members showed the following:
- 34% musicians may quit the industry due to COVID-19.
- 47% have been forced to look for work outside of music.
- 70% are unable to do more than a quarter of their usual work.
- 87% covered by furlough and SEISS will face financial hardship when schemes end in their current form.
- 88% do not think that Government has done enough to support musicians.

In addition to other restrictions, as we look to another business quarter with no live music, and nowhere in sight for it to return in full, we urgently need support to avoid the decay of our industry, the hardship experienced by our workforce and the mass exodus of highly-skilled individuals, which will result in irreparable damage to lives, businesses and the world-class standing of the UK music industry.

Institutions that have access to the Culture Recovery Fund largely do not have the ability to provide trickle-down opportunities to individuals that make up the workforce at this time, with current restrictions in place. We must see specific support for these individuals, now, before we experience damaging industry-wide loss. Grants provided by the likes of Arts Council and Help Musicians do not replace the huge losses faced by so many workers.

Scotland and Wales have substantial freelance hardship grants in place for those excluded from current government support schemes. In the music industry those excluded include many workers set up as limited companies, new starters, £50k+ earners and <50% freelancing. While the CRF is current, we urge you to allocate a portion as grants to these unsupported freelancers, available as soon as possible, while a longer-term support system is considered.

While the revitalisation of the music, arts and culture industries looks evermore bleak given the return to further restrictions, we also call for targeted schemes to increase consumer confidence and ‘back to music’ incentives for the public. Much like the Eat Out To Help Out scheme for the hospitality sector, we urge you to consider the two-for-one seats proposal mooted by the OneVoice campaign group for the live performance business.

Our collective memberships - musicians, songwriters, composers, producers, featured artists, and their managers - are central to this industry, and the UK economy. Their all-important contribution within the ecosystem as the value creators should not be ignored.

We call for a specific and robust financial support package for the workforce of the music industry and look forward to working with you on finding a solution with the utmost urgency. As much of the workforce faces further redundancies, financial devastation and irreparable damage, we need action now before we lose our talent and economic value for good.

Yours sincerely,

Council of Music Makers (UK)

Featured Artists Coalition (FAC) / Ivors Academy (IA) / Music Managers Forum (MMF) Music Producers Guild (MPG) / Musicians’ Union (MU)

Call for Arts Council England funding to enable venues to reopen with music, not remain silent #LetTheMusicPlay


LONDON - July 17, 2020

The UK Council of Music Makers (CMM) - comprising FAC, Ivors Academy, MMF, MPG and the MU - call on Government and Arts Council England to strategically use the COVID culture funding package to open venues safely and support music performance as a priority.    

As the united voice of music creators and performers, CMM writes to you in consideration of the opportunity for effective trickle-down potential of the Government's £1.5bn cultural fund by spending it wisely to support economic and musical activity, not inactivity.  

It is beneficial to our wider industry - and its vast economic contribution - to encourage and fund music venues (and other businesses) to reopen safely, with limited capacity and following COVID-safe guidelines, rather than supporting continuing closures.   

CMM understands the support of infrastructure such as venues and festivals is key to aid the recovery and revitalisation of the music industry ecosystem and we urge you to implement this with consideration to the supply chain of such organisational funding recipients.  

The positive effect of opening venues ‘primes the pump’ to allow money to move through the supply chain. By doing this you can support the livelihoods of the live industry as a whole, including artists and their teams, tech and hospitality staff within venues. This also has the huge public benefit of bringing live music back to the people.  

Our collective memberships - musicians, songwriters, composers, producers, featured artists, and their managers are vital to this restart and looking holistically at how funding is best used, you must consider their all-important place within the ecosystem.  

Funding mothballing of institutions serves to be counterproductive and much less beneficial for the wider economy than a subsidised restarting of economic activity. We call for this to be held in consideration when choosing to support organisations with this vital cultural fund.    

Yours sincerely,  

Council of Music Makers (UK)
Featured Artists Coalition (FAC)
Ivors Academy (IA)
Music Managers Forum (MMF)
Music Producers Guild (MPG)
Musicians’ Union (MU)




CMM lobbying update during the coronavirus pandemic


LONDON May 2020

During this crucial period, CMM has been working with DCMS and other music industry trade bodies, helping to develop solutions to hardship in our community and communicating the needs and experiences of our collective memberships. We understand there are still gaps and issues, and we continue to fight to close those. You can view some of CMM’s recommendations in this document Music Sector: Post Lockdown Priorities and Stimulus Package.

Please be assured that CMM continues to work diligently behind the scenes for you. In making our case to the government, it is hugely helpful for you to fill out any impact surveys published by your home organisations, FAC, Ivors Academy, MPG, MU and MMF. Please do continue talking to them about what you need. We will get through this together.


Call to sign Pledge Music survey - help the music industry help artists and business impacted


  LONDON, June 5th 2019

CMM companies Ivors Academy, FAC, MMF, MPG and MU have united with a host of music trade organisations and charities to launch a survey to assess the impact of the PledgeMusic collapse on artists in the UK. We urge all UK artists affected to fill out the survey so the industry can work collectively to assess what next steps can be taken and ensure support is given as required. PLEASE SHARE the survey with all artists impacted and use the hashtag #PledgeMusicAction


UK Council of Music Makers statement on the European Copyright Directive


  LONDON, March 26 2019

The UK Council of Music Makers (CMM) welcomes the European Parliament vote to approve the Copyright Directive. This is a historic turning point in the evolution of the digital era as outdated laws are modernised to balance the value gap between tech platforms that host creative works, whilst adequately remunerating and protecting the rights of those who create those works, as well as fans who wish to share the joy that such creative works bring.

Music makers are significant contributors to culture, as well as providing considerable growth in the economy. The full package of the Copyright Directive enables positive progress towards a digital future that is up to date with consumers and supportive of our creative community. Modernising the industry, it encourages a healthier market with real fairness and transparency. It promotes a sustainable, innovative, balanced music business with music makers at its heart.

The CMM has supported the positive campaigning of our UK and European counterparts to ensure that our message has been heard. We send special thanks to MEPs Axel Voss, Helga Truepel and Sajjad Karim for their support and work on this.

The CMM is looking forward to working with the industry on early and effective implementation of these new developments, to further support a flourishing future for the music business.

About UK Council of Music Makers (CMM)

The UK Council of Music Makers (CMM) - comprising Ivors Academy, FAC, MMF, MPG and the MU - represents the voice of UK songwriters, music producers, performing artists, musicians and music managers.

Featured Artists Coalition (FAC)
Ivors Academy (formerly BASCA)
Music Managers Forum (MMF)
Music Producers Guild (MPG)
Musicians’ Union (MU)  



UK COUNCIL OF MUSIC MAKERS LAUNCHES, COMMENDING ‘POSITIVE PROGRESS’ ON EU COPYRIGHT DIRECTIVE



Thursday 13th September 2018

The CMM is campaigning to achieve modernisation, fairness and transparency for music makers.

CMM Friends
Championing a bright future for music makers

A video message from CMM’s first patron Imogen Heap / MyCelia


LONDON, September 13th, 2018 -- The UK Council of Music Makers (CMM) – comprised of BASCA, FAC, MMF, MPG, MU - launches today, whilst commending the EU Copyright Directive vote result.  

The CMM campaigns for a better future for music makers, to ensure that they can thrive in the digital age. Its mission is to fight for the rights of songwriters, performing recorded artists, music managers, music producers and musicians that contribute to the music industry’s £4.4bn GVA contribution to the UK economy.

  Following the result of the EU Copyright Directive vote, announced September 12th, the CMM says: “The CMM commends the positive progress made with the vote result. We have supported the activity of our UK and European counterparts on this matter and lobbied at home and in Brussels, to ensure that our message is heard on the importance of the Copyright Directive as an opportunity to modernise the laws and commercial landscape governing how music makers get paid and how music fans engage with music.  

“Music makers bring untold joy and entertainment to the masses. They are significant contributors to culture, as well as providing a grand boost to the economy beyond most other sectors. The CMM believes that the full package of the proposed EU Copyright Directive as a whole will support our community, help modernise the industry, encourage a healthier market with fairness and transparency, and promote a sustainable, innovative music business with music makers at its heart. This is vital in ensuring music makers are clearly and adequately remunerated for their work.”  

To mark its launch, the CMM teamed up with creative and executive talent at London’s Strongrooms.  

As the business of being a music maker continues to evolve, the CMM will continue to campaign for a music ecosystem that is fully fair and fit for purpose – post-Brexit this will be at UK level with government and the IPO, for modernisation of the legal framework.  

The CMM is keen to engage partners to collaboratively aid its mission. It calls for government to convene representatives of the rights holders and creators in the music industry, to instigate a thorough discussion on transparency, updating pre-digital era contracts, ensuring contracts are fair, addressing value gaps and inequalities, and reviewing revenue flows. The CMM reminds government of its manifesto pledge of; “We will ensure content creators are appropriately rewarded for the content they make available online.”  

Without music and someone to perform it, there is no music business. Imogen Heap, music maker / FAC / MyCelia, says: “As a Music Maker in the digital era, and as part of CMM, I want to ensure the future is positive, progressive, and flourishing for creators in their development and beyond. The current climate around the economics of streaming and the digital transition of the music business has been hampered by outdated laws and outmoded contracts which can be convoluted, confusing and unfair - particularly for those music makers without the resources to fully understand or challenge them.

  “With collective voice and clout as the CMM, we pledge to take action on such issues with government, working with the IPO and others, to create an economy in which music makers can progress and thrive alongside innovations in technology.”

  Cam Blackwood, Record Producer / MPG, adds: “Music makers are the foundation and the future of the music business. The CMM wants to change the broken economics creatives face. The current model is failing future talent while it is based on the past. The CMM is here to make sure it’s sustainable.”

  Crispin Hunt, Chair, says: “As CMM, Music Makers provide the UK with a ‘one stop shop’ forum allowing labels, publishers, innovators, platforms, politicians or lobbies of any kind to commence constructive dialogue towards the fairer, more accurate, more transparent, more progressive, more innovative, more competitive music marketplace we all seek and the future demands. We look forward to that journey.”

  About Council of Music Makers Championing a bright future for music makers - the UK Council Of Music Makers (CMM), comprised of BASCA (British Academy of Songwriters, Composers & Authors), FAC (Featured Artists Coalition), MMF (Music Managers Forum), MPG (Music Producers Guild), MU (Musicians’ Union), are jointly campaigning for protections in law for the UK music industry’s creative talent to ensure they can thrive in the digital age.  

  CMM would like to thank founding patron Imogen Heap and Mycelia for supporting our work.

  The UK Council of Music Makers - comprised of BASCA, FAC, MMF, MPG, MU - launches with music industry talent and executives at Strongrooms Bar in Shoreditch, London.  

Pictured left to right:

Top row - Keith Ames (MU), Graham Davies (BASCA), Crispin Hunt (Music maker/BASCA), Fiona McGugan (MMF), Cameron Craig (Producer/Engineer/Mixer/MPG), Frank Carter (Artist), Matt Greer (ATC Management) and Dean Richardson (Frank Carter and the Rattlesnakes).
Middle row - Andrew Hunt (Record Producer/MPG), Annabella Coldrick (MMF), Jess Iszatt (BBC), Kevin Brennan MP, Dave Rowntree (Musician/FAC), Olga Fitzroy (Recording and Mixing Engineer), Richard Lightman (Producer/Composer/Sound Designer/MPG).
Bottom row - Jill Hollywood (Producer manager, Echo Beach Management), Jack Savoretti (Artist), Helienne Lindvall (Songwriter/Musician/BASCA), Ninja (Artist), Issie Barratt (BASCA), Naomi Pohl (MU), Ric Salmon (ATC Management/MMF), Cam Blackwood (Record Producer/MPG).  

Photo credit: Joanna Dudderidge
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Support

CMM runs on the generosity of our five member groups and patrons. We have plans to make available valuable events and workshops in the future that will benefit Music Makers and beyond. If you’d like to partner with us in providing education, fun and more services to our community, we’d be delighted for you to connect with us to explore opportunities.

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Patrons


Mycelia

CMM would like to thank founding patron Imogen Heap and Mycelia for supporting our work.

About Mycelia

Founded by Imogen Heap, Mycelia is a research and development hub for music makers, driven by a growing community of creatives, technologists and industry champions for the love of music. Their mission, through technology, is to bring to life a music maker database which will help realise a fair, sustainable and vibrant music ecosystem. To the non-music folks, this ultimately means fairer and faster payments to artists and a richer marketplace from which to build their careers by easing collaboration creatively and commercially.

About Imogen

Self-produced, independent, engaged, Imogen Heap continues to blur the boundaries between pure art form and creative entrepreneurship. Writing and producing 4 solo albums, Heap has developed a strong relationship with her fanbase. Creating tracks for movies, TV and most recently, the entire score for Harry Potter and the Cursed Child play, in addition to collaborating with artists including Ariana Grande, Mika, Nitin Sawhney, Josh Groban and Deadmau5, Heap’s been nominated for five Grammys, winning one for engineering and another for her Taylor Swift’s contribution on the album 1989. She has also won an Ivor Novello Award, the Artist and Manager Pioneer award, the MPG Inspiration Award, a Drama Desk win for Outstanding Music in a Play and an honorary Doctorate of Technology. In addition to her 20+ year music career, Heap strives to humanise the technology surrounding music performance and business operations with projects including the MI.MU gloves, a gestural music making system, and Mycelia’s ‘Creative Passport’ an ID hub for music makers.


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Resources

Contents

FAC
- FanFair guide for Artists - How to stop ticket touts
- Artist to Artist to Fan - FAC Pledge Fan Guide
- PledgeMusic Administration – AIM Guidance Note
- Do The Rights Thing - Top Tips: How To Network
- Attitude Is Everything - DIY Access Guide


Ivors Academy
- Manage Your Composing Career.
- Five Top Tax Tips.
- The Art of Negotiation.
- Songwriters on Songwriting.

MMF
- Managing Expectations: An exploration into the changing role and value of the music manager.
- Dissecting the Digital Dollar.
- The Music Managers Guide to Mental Health.
- Tips for Beating Tours When Buying Tickets Online.

MPG
- Resources coming soon...

MU
- Safe Space - Sexual Harassment and Discrimination.
- Fair Play Venue Scheme.
- Advice on Hiring Musicians.


FAC Logo  

FanFair guide for Artists - How to stop ticket touts Download here.
Artist to Artist to Fan - FAC Pledge Fan Guide Download here.
PledgeMusic Administration – AIM Guidance Note Download here.
Do The Rights Thing - Top Tips: How To Network Download here.
Attitude Is Everything - DIY Access Guide Download here.

Ivors Academy Logo  

MANAGE YOUR COMPOSING CAREER Download PDF
MANAGEMENT
- Advice from Classical composers Dr Shirley Thompson OBE, Alexander Campkin, John McLeod and Soosan Lolavar.

FIVE TOP TAX TIPS Download PDF
FINANCE
- Eric Longley, Director of Taxation at Prager Metis, shares his wisdom with the aim to help composers and lyricists with this necessary part of business.

THE ART OF NEGOTIATION Download PDF
BUSINESS
- Award-winning composer and sound designer, Marc Sylvan, on knowing your worth and knowing how to get it.

SONGWRITERS ON SONGWRITING Download PDF
CREATIVE
- Highlights from BASCA and FAC event ‘All About Songwriting’ hosted by Imogen Heap and Katie Melua, featuring: MNEK, Carla Marie Williams, William Orbit and BASCA Fellow Don Black.

MMF Logo  
MANAGING EXPECTATIONS Download PDF

Managing Expectations, is underpinned by a survey of more than 180 music managers as well as in-depth interviews conducted by Music Ally’s Eamonn Forde with managers representing acts including The 1975, Gorillaz, Mumford & Sons, Robbie Williams, J Hus, Little Simz, Nick Cave, The xx, Blue Lab Beats, Two Door Cinema Club and Bill Ryder-Jones.

In detail, it examines how managers support talent development, their relationships with record labels, the diverse and expanding skills set they require, the challenges around mental health, and the evolving commercial models between music managers and both their creative clients and industry partners.

DISSECTING THE DIGITAL DOLLAR Download PDF
STREAMING
- Helping artists and managers navigate the streaming business.
- Dissecting The Digital Dollar is a series of reports, guides and tools from the Music Managers Forum designed to help artists and managers better understand the streaming business and the impact the shift to streaming has had on the wider recorded music industry. The reports were produced for the MMF by music business consultancy CMU Insights.

THE MUSIC MANAGERS GUIDE TO MENTAL HEALTH Download PDF
MENTAL HEALTH
- Looking after yourself and the artists you work with.
- MMF and Music Support present this guide to help managers: achieve in their job without sacrificing their health, provide information on what to do if management or artists are having difficulties, and signpost organisations and services that exist to help and support during emergencies and in the longer term.

TIPS FOR BEATING TOUTS WHEN BUYING TICKETS ONLINE Download PDF
TICKETING
- Making ticketing fairer and more transparent for audiences and for artists.
- The FanFair Alliance has put together this guide, with 10 tips to successfully navigate the ticket-buying process. There are no guarantees of success but their advice will reduce your risk of getting ripped off – and help you buy tickets at the price set by the artist, not by a ticket tout.

MPG Logo  
Resources coming soon...

MU Logo  
SAFE SPACE
SEXUAL HARASSMENT AND DISCRIMINATION
- Support and guidance if you face sexual harassment, discrimination or abuse in the workplace. - You can also sign up to support the Music Sector Code of Practice.

FAIR PLAY VENUE SCHEME
VENUES
- A database of venues that have signed up to the MU’s Fair Play Guide, committing to treat musicians fairly.

ADVICE ON HIRING MUSICIANS
LIVE MUSIC
- Information for members of the public who want to know how to find a music teacher or live music for their event, and what they need to know in advance.

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We'd love to hear from you. We'd love to hear your thoughts. Please do get in touch.
Email us: info@councilmusicmakers.org

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